Chip Tsao

Columnist

Chip Tsao is a Hong Kong commentator and media veteran. He has vast experience in the media industry and was the deputy chief editor of Ming Pao's supplement papers and deputy chief editor of Overseas Chinese Daily News. Currently, he is a columnist at Apple Daily and Next Magazine.

Czech author and illustrator Miroslav Šašek has captured sights and scenes of Hong Kong in the 1960s.

Czech illustrator Miroslav Šašek and his images of Hong Kong from the 1960s

In the 1960s, Czech author and illustrator Miroslav Šašek came to Hong Kong and captured the sights and scenes of that period in This is Hong Kong, one of the books in his “This is…” series of children’s picture books. Cup Media has recently published a Chinese version of the book, in a timely throwback to good old Hong Kong, before any of the current unrest took hold of the city.
Silicon Valley has long had a "relationship" with China, regardless of the White House. (iStock)

The ‘adultery’ between Silicon Valley and China

Hong Kong commentator Chip Tsao notes the “adulterous” relationship between Silicon Valley tech companies and China, the inevitability of technology transfer, and the US government’s naive demand for parity in all its dealings with China.
Demonstrators gesture the "Five demands, not one less" protest motto during a protest in Hong Kong, China, on Wednesday, 1 July 2020. Hong Kong woke up to a new reality on Wednesday, after China began enforcing a sweeping security law that could reshape the financial hub’s character 23 years after it took control of the former British colony. (Roy Liu/Bloomberg)

Why Carrie Lam will never understand Hong Kong's youths

Hong Kong political columnist Chip Tsao makes his observations on an emerging group of people who lack sufficient job security and face a sense of uncertainty and precariousness — the precariat. This group is plugged in to social media, which means they have quick access to information, but are also able to make comparisons that might lead to dissatisfaction. Will the civil servants running Hong Kong be able to empathise with this increasingly marginalised group in society?
Demonstrators raise their fists as they gather on 2 June 2020 in Saint Paul, Minnesota, to protest the death of George Floyd while in police custody. (Chandan Khanna/AFP)

A 'left-wing cultural revolution' has come to America?

There is little doubt that the US is in disarray at the moment. Hong Kong political commentator Chip Tsao does not hold back in giving his views on the current situation in the US, claiming that America’s move to the left after eight years under the Democratic Party have worsened the culture of political correctness and left little room for policies that motivate disadvantaged groups to keep their feet on the ground and contribute to society. The middle class is also made to shoulder growing societal and financial burdens. In that light, would the prospect of a change in the US government in five months time be a boon or bane?
A boy plays on a pile of garbage covering a drain at a slum area on World Environment Day in New Delhi, India, 5 June 2020. (Adnan Abidi/REUTERS)

China and India: When Western democracy fails and only utopia remains

Following the recent China-India border clash, Hong Kong columnist Chip Tsao takes a look at both countries and muses that even as some viewpoints converge, different systems and different national characteristics produce very different fates.
US President Donald Trump tweets "CHINA!" on his Twitter account. (@realDonaldTrump/Twitter)

China: Sole preoccupation of US foreign policy

Chip Tsao says that US foreign policy has for two decades focused on threats such as the “axis of evil” and global terrorism. With the coronavirus escalating US threat perceptions of China, will the rising dragon now dictate its every move?
Pro-democracy activists tear a placard of Winnie-the-Pooh that represents Chinese President Xi Jinping during a protest against a proposed new security law outside the Chinese Liaison Office in Hong Kong, 24 May 2020. (Isaac Lawrence/AFP)

Hong Kong’s Cinderella story ended in 1997

With the Chinese government about to enact a national security law for Hong Kong, the SAR is worried about its future and people are afraid. Hong Kong columnist Chip Tsao, in his usual abrasive way, notes that over the more than 20 years following Deng Xiaoping's passing and Hong Kong's return, Beijing and Hong Kong have been butting heads to the point that everything now seems to be an irreconcilable, destructive mess. Hong Kong has been taken hostage, he says.
Students sit for the Diploma of Secondary Education (DSE) university entrance exams in Hong Kong, 24 April 2020. (Jerome Favre/AFP)

History lessons: Who gets to decide what is humiliating, unfair, right or wrong?

Following a recent controversy over a history question in a national exam about whether Japan did more good than harm to China in the first half of the 20th century, Hong Kong columnist Chip Tsao asks: "Who gets to decide how history is read?"
A person crosses the street on 27 March 2020 in New York City. (Angela Weiss/AFP)

The lies of globalisation

Seeing what was going on in China and how this would affect global supply chains, the West should have predicted the pandemonium they are facing now, says Chip Tsao. One radical thought he proposes is to impose a forced lockdown of the world, letting the virus die a natural death. But even that is but an impossible dream. Ultimately, the pandemic's greatest gift to mankind is forcing one and all to confront the hard truths of globalisation.