Economy

A picture illustration of the banknotes of the euro, HK dollar, US dollar, Japanese yen, British pound and Chinese yuan. (Jason Lee/File Photo/Reuters)

Escalating China-US confrontation will accelerate RMB internationalisation

Peking University PhD student Xiong Lan believes that as US-China tensions ratchet up from competition to confrontation, it is likely that the process of internationalising the renminbi (RMB) will be accelerated. The next ten years will be crucial, if China is to reach targets such as for the RMB to exceed 10% market share of international currencies by 2029 and account for 30% of global reserves in the long run. What obstacles stand in the way?
A general view of Benzilanzhen, Yunnan province, China, 22 July 2021. (CNS)

Overcoming uneven growth in China's poorer western provinces: Potential and challenges

High-speed rail and other infrastructure development have been proceeding apace under China’s Western Region Development Strategy. However, in trying to catch up with the eastern region, the gap between provinces in the western region may have inadvertently been widened. Without an effective division of labour, wasted resources and unnecessary competition are likely.
A man waters a tree planted on the edge of the Gobi desert on the outskirts of Wuwei, Gansu province, China, 15 April 2021. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Can China revive its poorer western provinces?

China has sought to rectify the imbalance in east-west regional development by improving connectivity and accelerating infrastructure-building in the western provinces through the Western Region Land-Sea Corridor and BRI projects. How successful they will be depends largely on continued capital injections, the region’s greater opening up and good cooperation with China’s neighbouring countries.
People wearing face masks walk at a main shopping area in Shanghai, China, 27 January 2021. (Aly Song/File Photo/Reuters)

The most trusted provinces in China, according to Taobao

In a study on consumers’ shopping patterns across provinces in China, Associate Professor Chu Junhong of NUS Business School and Professor Pradeep K. Chintagunta of the Chicago Booth School of Business found that Chinese buyers tend to buy from sellers they trust, and a seller’s location forms a large part of that equation.
A pedestrian wearing a face mask walks over Westminster Bridge near the Houses of Parliament in central London on 7 June 2021. (Tolga Akmen/AFP)

China's Greater Bay Area ready market for British education exports

While the UK imports a high volume of goods from China, it exports many sought-after services in areas including finance, law and accounting. Its latest niche is its expansion into education, targeting the Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macau Greater Bay Area.
Workers pull a rope as a cargo ship carrying containers docks at the Lianyungang Port Container Terminal in Lianyungang, Jiangsu province, China on 24 March 2021. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

Demand swells for Chinese shipping crews amid global shortage

Amid worsening Covid-19 outbreaks in India and many Southeast Asia countries, ship operators are turning to China's massive workforce of 1.65 million crew members to fill the global shortage of crew members. Why are Chinese crew members in such high demand? Caixin journalists Jia Tianqiong and Yang Ge find out.
A rapidKL train travels along an elevated track above streets in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia on 1 June 2021. (Samsul Said/Bloomberg)

Chinese companies see ASEAN as a bright spot for investment

According to a pulse survey conducted by Standard Chartered, Chinese companies are attracted to ASEAN’s large market and potential as regional production bases. External factors such as the Regional Comprehensive Economic Agreement (RCEP) could also funnel greater Chinese investment into the region in areas such as high-value manufacturing, energy and digital services.
A vendor (centre) sells meat at her stall in front of a residential building in Hanoi, Vietnam on 31 March 2021. (Manan Vatsyayana/AFP)

Shifting supply chains from China to Southeast Asia is hard but necessary

Amid the effects of the China-US trade war and the Covid-19 pandemic, global manufacturers are seeing the need to adopt a ”China+1“ strategy by diversifying their supply chains or business operations beyond China. However, moving parts of the supply chain to the Southeast Asian region is not so straightforward. What challenges do they face and how are they overcoming them? Will China's position as the "world's factory" be shaken and how will its economic model be changed?
A sign indicating digital yuan, also referred to as e-CNY, is pictured at a shopping mall in Shanghai, China, 5 May 2021. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China’s central bank digital currency (CBDC) innovations

In part 2 of his article on China’s digital currency ambitions, James Pang takes a look at how a Chinese central bank-issued digital currency — the DCEP — can complement existing e-payment methods and have an edge over traditional cash and cryptocurrencies when it is fully rolled out. Being the first major economy to launch a CBDC, China’s experience will be useful for other countries looking to hop onto the digital currency bandwagon. Utilisation of Chinese DCEP could also aid the process of internationalising the Chinese Yuan (RMB).