Economy

The skyline of the Beijing's Central Business District rises behind people crossing a street during evening rush hour, April 15, 2020. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS)

Without cash payouts, are China's Covid-19 economic measures enough?

Japanese academic Kai Kajitani examines the enormous impact that the coronavirus is having on the Chinese economy. Measures are in place to absorb the shocks — but unlike many countries, the country has so far gone with other routes apart from direct cash payouts. Will these efforts be enough? And are the voices of the underclass in society being heard?
Chinese RMB banknotes are seen behind an illuminated stock graph in this illustration taken on 10 February 2020. (Dado Ruvic/Illustration/File Photo/Reuters)

China's yet-to-be-announced stimulus package: Dispensing the right dose

In the aftermath of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, China trotted out a mega stimulus package that some analysts say did more harm than good. Months into the coronavirus pandemic and China’s support measures have still been measured. How much further will it go in the coming weeks to alleviate the economic strain on enterprises and individuals?
Empty streets are seen amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 15, 2020 as stay at home order has been extended in Washington, DC until May 15. (Daniel Slim/AFP)

The Great Lockdown: How to ensure a speedy recovery?

With the IMF forecast of a 3% contraction in the global economy for 2020, the economic outlook for a coronavirus-ravaged world is grim. Cai ponders how the world can pick itself up after going through what the IMF terms “the Great Lockdown” and the onslaught of “the worst recession since the Great Depression, and far worse than the Global Financial Crisis”.
An employee at a factory in Wuhan, April 6, 2020. (STR/AFP)

US companies in China: No place that can take China's place

Despite a proposed White House executive order to reduce dependence on China for medical supplies, and a promise by US National Economic Council President Larry Kudlow that the US government will pay for US companies to return home, US companies in China are not biting. Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks to some company leaders to find out why.
Will US companies heed the call to "go home"? (Yasin Akgul/AFP)

How many US companies will leave China?

US National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow has recently called for US companies to leave China and move back to the US. Hong Kong columnist David Ng gives his take on how likely it is that US companies will heed the call.
In this file photo, a consumer is choosing flour at a supermarket in Taiyuan city, Shanxi province, China. Chinese officials have repeatedly reassured the Chinese people that food supplies are sufficient and there is no need to hoard. (CNS)

Will China plunge into a food crisis? Officials say no

As the Covid-19 pandemic slows down in China, the panic-buying frenzy goes on. Chen Jing reports on people bulking up on supplies across China amid fears of a looming food shortage.
In this photo taken on 3 February 2020, a woman wearing a mask is seen on a bridge in front of the financial district of Pudong, Shanghai, China, as the country is hit by the Covid-19 pandemic. (Aly Song/Reuters)

China will have too many mask-making factories

China is estimated to be making 200 million masks daily and may have too many mask-making factories in the near future. Chinese commentator Cai Enze envisages the likely scenario facing these enterprises scrambling to turn a quick profit out of mask manufacturing. Looking at the statistics, the world needs to better coordinate how these masks can reach pandemic-stricken countries in dire need of masks.
In this photo taken on 30 March, consumers line up and wait to enter a mall in Wuhan after it resumed operations. (CNS)

Wuhan businesses' quest for survival after 76-day lockdown

To help businesses get back on their feet, the Wuhan municipal government recently announced that it is raising 20 billion RMB to roll out a rescue package for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). On the ground, many companies find themselves in more dire straits now than when the city was under a complete lockdown, and business owners are generally not confident of surviving the present downturn.
A farmer harvests cabbage at Huarong county in Hunan province, at the border of Hubei on 5 March 2020. (Noel Celis/AFP)

The impact of Covid-19 on the agriculture sector in China

Vincent Martin, Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) representative in China and North Korea, shares his thoughts on the Chinese government’s efforts to limit the impact of Covid-19 on agriculture and food security in China. He remains sanguine that the country has enough wind in its sails to see it through this tough period and embark firmly on new beginnings.