Han Dongping

Professor, Warren Wilson College

Han Dongping is currently a political science professor at Warren Wilson College, USA. He teaches East Asian history, international politics of the Pacific, comparative government of the Global South, politics of developing states, Chinese government and politics, agriculture, community and the environment and the Chinese Cultural Revolution. His major works include: China through the eyes of an overseas Chinese (Chinese Social Science Press, 2019), “China’s rural reform and its impact on China’s food security” (Journal of Labor and Society, 2018), “Human Rights in a Realist World — A Review of Sino-U.S. Confrontation over Human Rights” (The Oriental Anthropologist, 2004) and “Impact of the Cultural Revolution on Rural Education and Economic Development” (Modern China, January 2001). He also wrote numerous commentaries for China Daily and other Chinese newspapers in both English and Chinese. He was guest professor at Hebei University, Wenzhou University, and Nanchang University.

In this file photo taken on 1 June 2020, NYPD police officers watch demonstrators in Times Square during a "Black Lives Matter" protest. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP)

Between the US and China, which is the police state?

While some in China admire certain values the US upholds such as the rule of law, Han Dongping observes the irony that in many ways, China’s age-old practice of community policing at the grassroots level may have produced a more humane way of rehabilitating rather than incarcerating offenders. If the George Floyd case that sparked angry protests is anything to go by, the US seems overrun with law enforcement woes rather than ruled by the law.
China’s rise will not be thwarted by the US. (iStock)

The US will accelerate its own decline by suppressing China

US academic Han Dongping shows that by all intents and purposes, China does not wish to take up the dominant position in the international system. But this does not mean that the US will stop feeling threatened by it and continue trying to thump China down. Like a game of whac-a-mole, China’s rise will not be thwarted and it will keep coming back, he says.
A protester calling for Taiwan independence waves a flag in front of Democratic Progressive Party in Taipei, Taiwan, on 20 May 2020. (Ann Wang/Reuters)

Taiwan would once again be abandoned amid China-US competition

Han Dongping says looking back in history, one should not underestimate the tenacity of the CCP in achieving its aims. At the same time, no matter how determined each actor is, whether it is the CCP, Taiwan or the US, outcomes may not go as intended, and Taiwan may unwittingly be steered towards an end that no one wishes to see.