Han Yong Hong

Associate Editor, Zaobao; Editor, Zaobao.com

Yong Hong is associate editor of Zaobao and editor of Zaobao.com. She joined Lianhe Zaobao as a journalist in 2000, covering theatre, music and visual arts. In 2005, she was appointed Correspondent for the Zaobao Beijing Bureau and later become Beijing Chief Correspondent in 2009. She received the Business China Young Achiever Award in 2011, making her the second recipient of this award, and the first journalist to receive this recognition.

A face mask is attached to the sculpture at the Carlo Alberto Square, in Turin, Italy. (Massimo Pinca/REUTERS)

Does China owe the world an apology?

It may not be said, but some people feel that China owes the world an apology for being the source of the Covid-19 epidemic. How valid is this claim? Zaobao’s associate editor Han Yong Hong examines both sides of the debate.
In this photo taken on 19 February 2020, a medical staff onboard a bus bids farewell to his daughter before leaving to fight the virus at the front line. (CNS)

A better, stronger China after the epidemic? But at what cost?

Han Yong Hong opines that viewed through the lens of the coronavirus outbreak, two views come into focus about China’s prospects of emerging weaker or stronger from the crisis. But whether it is one or the other, it is the innocent members of the public who are hurt, and especially the 2000 over people who have paid the price of this calamity with their lives. No amount of economic progress will be able to compensate for the pain they have endured.
People wearing masks at VivoCity near HarbourFront MRT station in Singapore on 24 Jan 2020. (SPH)

Chinese netizens: Is Singapore 'zen' or has it given up?

Chinese social media has been rife with commentaries asking if Singapore is being too lax and defeatist in its approach to tackling the coronavirus outbreak. Han Yong Hong says beneath the veneer of calm lies characteristics that are peculiar to Singapore society.
The Wuhan coronavirus outbreak: A price too high to pay for the Chinese people. (CNS)

Wuhan coronavirus: China has paid a high price

Chinese President Xi Jinping chaired a meeting with the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China to discuss the coronavirus and its preventive measures on 3 Feb. However, no actual footage of the meeting was broadcast on state TV. This highly unusual presentation drew speculations. Veteran China affairs journalist Han Yong Hong observes that although the authorities have stepped up its efforts to stem the tide of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus in the last few days, China has paid a high price.
Supporters of Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen outside the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) headquarters in Taipei, January 2020. Young people played a big role in Tsai's win, and will continue to exert an influence in the future. (Tyrone Siu/REUTERS)

He who wins over the young people wins the world

Just about a week after the Taiwan presidential election, the rhetoric from both sides of the Taiwan Strait is aggressive. Will China take military action to take back Taiwan, or go with a safer approach? Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong examines the reasons for Tsai Ing-wen’s big win and concludes that young people will play a major role in the future.
China's goal is to eradicate poverty within 2020, including rural areas. (Tingshu Wang/REUTERS)

Only 17 people left in poverty

China’s efforts in alleviating poverty have worked well in Jiangsu, where there are apparently only 17 people left living in poverty. However, there is scepticism on the figures, as well as examples of how poverty alleviation efforts have not worked. Zaobao associate editor Han Yong Hong looks at how China can do better.
Taiwan and mainland China will have to navigate cross-strait relations in 2020. (iStock)

Cold hostility across the Taiwan Strait in 2020

The New Year speeches given by Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen and Chinese president Xi Jinping betrayed an atmosphere of cold hostility. Taiwan has made certain moves that have not gone down well with mainland China, seemingly with the support of the US, while the image of the CCP in Taiwan is not at its best. Han Yong Hong asks: “How will China respond?”
Hong Kong youth protesters think they can count on external support. But can they really? (Sam Yeh/AFP)

How much help should Taiwan offer Hong Kong protesters?

Young Hong Kong protesters seem to take for granted that they have the support of other countries and regions. How accurate is that perception? Veteran China affairs journalist Han Yong Hong analyses the recent war of words over the prospect of Taiwan enacting a law to help Hong Kong asylum seekers, and dishes out a dose of realism in her assessment.
TikTok has found itself mired in court cases recently. (Dado Ruvic/Reuters)

TikTok: Another victim of the China-US tech war

Veteran China affairs journalist Han Yong Hong examines recent flak TikTok has received in the US, suggesting that it reflects different approaches the US and China have towards freedom of speech and its responsibilities. Interestingly, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is in the front rank of those criticising TikTok in the name of upholding free speech. Who has the users' interest in mind and how can Tik Tok fend off the heat?