Yang Danxu

Beijing Correspondent, Lianhe Zaobao

Before Yang Danxu became Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent, she was the newspaper's Shanghai correspondent. When she was based in Shanghai, she covered politics, diplomacy, political economy and social trends in the country, focusing especially on the Yangtze River Delta region.

A vendor holding up a Donald Trump latex mask that she sells.

Who will win the US election? Chinese vendors at ‘the world’s supermarket’ think they have the answer

Four years ago, when most political pundits put their money on Hillary Clinton instead of Donald Trump, vendors in the Yiwu International Trade Market in Zhejiang province already knew that Trump would win. Orders of presidential election merchandise gave them the clue. Termed “the world’s supermarket”, Yiwu is the world’s biggest wholesale market of small commodities. How is it seeking to reinvent itself in the pandemic downturn, and what does this year’s orders list tell them about the likely outcome of the 2020 US presidential election?
An aircraft prepares to launch off the flight deck of carrier USS Ronald Reagan while conducting operations in the South China Sea, 14 August 2020. (US Navy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jason Tarleton/US navy website)

Mutually assured disruption: US-China brinkmanship in the Taiwan Strait

​Even as the US and China are ramping up their military presence in the Taiwan Strait, academics say that this is to prevent military conflict and ease tensions in the area. Nonetheless, attempts at inducing the opponent to beat a retreat will still ratchet up tensions in the region. Yang Danxu analyses this case of creeping escalation.
The logo for Tencent Holdings Ltd.'s WeChat app is arranged for a photograph on smartphones in Hong Kong, China, on Friday, Aug. 7, 2020. President Donald Trump signed a pair of executive orders prohibiting U.S. residents from doing business with the Chinese-owned TikTok and WeChat apps beginning 45 days from now, citing the national security risk of leaving Americans' personal data exposed. (Ivan Abreu/Bloomberg)

Apple or WeChat — which would the Chinese choose?

With Trump's executive order prohibiting US "transactions" with China apps TikTok and WeChat, it may be harder for the Chinese to use WeChat on iPhones. But when it comes to making a choice between using WeChat for daily life or sticking with iPhones, which would the Chinese choose?
People ride shared bicycles past the CCTV headquarters in the Central Business District in Beijing, China, on 4 August 2020. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Chinese academics: China must avoid falling into ‘Trump’s trap’

China has limited retaliatory actions against the US, according to Chinese academics. What are China’s options, and will it dance to the US's tune and fall into 'Trump's trap'?
The TikTok logo is displayed in the app store in this photograph in view of a video feed of US President Donald Trump, 3 Aug 2020. (Hollie Adams/Bloomberg)

US wants it banned while the Chinese calls it a traitor. Is this the end of TikTok?

As TikTok edges towards its deadline of 15 September to either be sold to a US buyer or banned in the US, it is ironic to think that Bytedance, its parent company, is getting bruised from all sides. Some of its harshest critics, in fact, are intensely patriotic Chinese citizens who think that it has not gone far enough in pushing back on unreasonable US demands. Can ByteDance appease the gods and the hordes before the deadline is up?
The TikTok app icon sits displayed on a smartphone in front of the national flags of China and the US in this arranged photograph in London, 3 August 2020. (Hollie Adams/Bloomberg)

Chinese companies going global? Take heed of TikTok's crisis

With its “China DNA” and despite its popularity, TikTok may end up being blocked in the US and eventually elsewhere in the world. Will its discussions with Microsoft work out? Or will it have to pull out of the US? And beyond TikTok, what does this episode mean for Chinese companies in the process of internationalising their businesses?
People gather near the US Consulate General in Chengdu, 27 July 2020, as the final group of U.S. personnel from the consulate is expected to leave after China ordered its closure in response to a US order for China to shut its consulate in Houston. (Thomas Peter/REUTERS)

‘Melon-munching crowd’ in China enjoying the show amid US consulate closure

The recent diplomatic row between China and the US sparked off by the US ordering the closure of the Chinese consulate in Houston has ended for now, with the closure of the US consulate in Chengdu. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu notes that the spectator “melon-munching crowd” has responded with nationalist sentiments, and the media in China is fanning the flames. Can China-US relations be salvaged?
Singapore Ambassador to China Lui Tuck Yew spoke to Zaobao on Singapore-China relations. (SPH)

Singapore’s ambassador to China Lui Tuck Yew: Singapore must stay relevant to China

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the establishment of bilateral relations between China and Singapore. In a recent interview with Lianhe Zaobao, Singapore’s Ambassador to China Lui Tuck Yew takes stock of the relationship, speaks of the challenges and opportunities brought about by Covid-19, and looks ahead to greater heights that the two countries can scale together through greater collaboration and cooperation.
In this file photo a teacher and her students pose with Communist Party emblems during a class about the history of the Communist Party at a school in Lianyungang, in China's eastern Jiangsu province, 28 June 2020. (STR/AFP)

Chinese academic: Banning all CCP members from the US is to give up hope on China

Chinese Communist Party (CCP) members and their families may soon be banned from travelling to the US, while there are other indications that the CCP is becoming a target for the US in a new global competition of ideology. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu examines the signs of worsening US-China relations.