Yu Zeyuan

Yu Zeyuan

Beijing Correspondent and Senior Researcher, Lianhe Zaobao

Yu Zeyuan (real name Yu Haisheng) started in 1993 as a journalist and editor with Xinhua's foreign news desk, then joined the University of Hawaii as a visiting academic from 1996 to 1997. Since 2000, he has been Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent and senior researcher.

A person works at a residential building construction site in Beijing, China, on 6 September 2023. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Chinese property market: Second wind or brief respite?

Over the last two years, the Chinese property market suffered a downturn and this has had a knock-on effect on the country’s economy. In recent weeks, the government has loosened restrictions and rolled out policies to make it easier for the public to buy houses and to boost property sales. Is this a turning point for the Chinese property market? Will the government’s mantra that “houses are for living in, not speculation” take a back seat henceforth? Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan reports.
Protestors attend a rally against Japan's plan to discharge treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant into the ocean, in front of the headquarters of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), the operator of the nuclear plant in Tokyo, Japan, on 24 August 2023. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters)

Frostier Japan-China ties with Fukushima treated wastewater discharge

Japan’s discharge of treated nuclear wastewater into the sea has dealt another blow to the political, economic and trade relations between China and Japan. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan elaborates.
A man holds the Russian national flag in front of a Wagner Group military vehicle in Rostov-on-Don late on 24 June 2023. (Stringer/AFP)

Coup in Russia sparks debate in China

The attempted coup in Russia by the leader of the Wagner mercenary group Yevgeny Prigozhin may have been quickly quelled, but it has led to much discussion in China, from some people feeling vindicated for their support of Ukraine, to others feeling worried about how the world will see China if Russia loses the war in Ukraine.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken arrives in Bejing, China, 18 June 2023. (Leah Millis/Reuters)

Blinken’s trip to China is not a wasted one

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s visit to Beijing was arranged through mutual agreement rather than an invitation from China, and it remains to be seen what will come out of it. Will there be any consensus reached, and what does this mean for future China-US relations?
A staff member works inside the Great Hall of the People ahead of the closing session of the National People's Congress (NPC) in Beijing on 13 March 2023. (Noel Celis/Pool via Reuters)

Why ‘political swindlers’ are still rife in China

”Political swindlers“ are a problem in China’s political circles, with officials getting conned into providing favours for who they think are high-powered individuals with connections to the CCP’s top leadership, only to find themselves in trouble when the game is exposed. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan gives examples of such cases, and efforts to clamp down on such fakery.
Chinese President Xi Jinping, Kazakhstan's President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, Kyrgyzstan's President Sadyr Japarov, Tajikistan's President Emomali Rahmon, Turkmenistan's President Serdar Berdymukhamedov and Uzbekistan's President Shavkat Mirziyoyev arrive for the joint press conference of the China-Central Asia Summit in Xian, Shaanxi province, China, 19 May 2023. (Florence Lo/Reuters)

China strengthens its influence in Central Asia as Russia looks on

The China-Central Asia Summit may have ended last week, but it seems that it is just the beginning for China’s re-consolidated relations with Central Asia and also Russia, with an exchange of visits between Chinese and Russian officials coming up. Lianhe Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that China’s influence in Central Asia is strengthening, not least the result of Russia’s embroilment in the war in Ukraine.
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping in Beijing, China, 4 February 2022. (Sputnik/Aleksey Druzhinin/Kremlin via Reuters)

What to expect from Xi-Putin meeting in Russia

Much attention is on Chinese President Xi Jinping’s visit to Russia, with speculation on whether China will drop its neutral stance on the Ukraine war, or stick to strengthening the fundamentals of their bilateral relationship. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan gives his analysis.
(From left to right) Newly-elected Chinese state councilor Qin Gang, state councilor and secretary-general of the State Council Wu Zhenglong, state councilor Li Shangfu, China's Vice Premiers Zhang Guoqing, Ding Xuexiang, He Lifeng, Liu Guozhong, Chinese state councilors Wang Xiaohong and Shen Yiqin swear an oath after they were elected during the fifth plenary session of the National People's Congress (NPC) at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on 12 March 2023. (Noel Celis/AFP)

China’s new State Council and the president’s men

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks at the new Chinese government installed over the weekend, noting the gradual weakening of power of the State Council, just as many of President Xi’s close aides are appointed to the executive body. What might this mean for China’s leadership in the future?
Chinese Premier Li Keqiang delivers the government work report on 5 March 2023 at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. (CNS)

Li Keqiang’s departure means political leaders of Xi’s generation have all but retired

Li Keqiang delivered his last government work report on 5 March in his capacity as Chinese premier, a role he had held for a decade. With his departure from the scene comes the retreat of fellow CYL faction cadres, and the retirement of the political leaders of Xi’s generation. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan has the details.