Yu Zeyuan

Beijing correspondent and senior researcher, Lianhe Zaobao

Yu Zeyuan (real name Yu Haisheng) started in 1993 as a journalist and editor with Xinhua's foreign news desk, then joined the University of Hawaii as a visiting academic from 1996 to 1997. Since 2000, he has been Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent and senior researcher.

A masked anti-government protester holds a flag supporting Hong Kong independence during a march against Beijing's plans to impose national security legislation in Hong Kong, 24 May 2020. (Tyrone Siu/REUTERS)

Why Beijing is taking the risk to push through the national security law and rein in Hong Kong

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that this year’s “two sessions” in China includes a contentious national security law for Hong Kong that has been months in the making. The law is unlikely to go down well in Hong Kong, nor with Hong Kong watchers with vested interests such as the US. What gave Beijing the confidence to push through such a law at this point in time?
Military delegates leave the Great Hall of the People after a meeting ahead of National People's Congress (NPC), China's annual session of parliament, in Beijing, 4 March 2019. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

China's military spending amid the pandemic: Will it go up or down this year?

China's economy has taken a hit from the pandemic, but in the face of external challenges from the US and concerns over cross-straits relations, military spending is expected to be one major topic at China’s upcoming "two sessions". Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the evidence as to whether it will go up or down.
US and Chinese flags at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, 14 February 2019. (Mark Schiefelbein via REUTERS)

China to punish Western 'anti-China' forces and 'make them feel the pain', according to Chinese official media report

Following the filing of lawsuits in the US against China for the coronavirus outbreak, China is preparing to hit back with punitive measures. Australia, too, is facing a suspension of beef exports, while China’s Ministry of Commerce has announced tighter controls over exports of medical supplies. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan reports.
People's Liberation Army soldiers march to their barracks opposite the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on 24 February 2020. (Greg Baker/AFP)

Chinese military starts 79-day exercises amid pandemic to deter Taiwan and warn the US

Chinese PLA forces will be undertaking rigorous training at Bohai Bay near Tianjin for two and a half months. It is probably not a coincidence that Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen’s inauguration day — 20 May — is well within that period and the military’s activities will serve as a constant reminder that any overstepping of the boundaries can be met with sharp reprisals.
Firefighters and paramedics with Anne Arundel County Fire Department wear enhanced PPE while preparing to transport a suspected coronavirus patient, 3 May, 2020. (Alex Edelman/AFP)

Blame game can lead to showdown between China and the US

China and the US are pointing fingers at each other for the coronavirus, with the US seeking accountability and compensation from China. Will it work? And what consequences will there be for China-US relations? Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the circumstances.
US President Donald Trump's hand is seen as he points to take a question during a Coronavirus Task Force press briefing at the White House in Washington, DC, April 19, 2020. (Jim Watson/AFP)

So who leaked the virus? The resurrection of conspiracy theories

The war of words between the US and China continues, as Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the conspiracy theories that have resurfaced over the possible origins of the coronavirus.
In this file photo taken on 24 September 2019, visitors hold their mobile phones in front of exhibits showing the People's Liberation Army Navy's first aircraft carrier Liaoning, during an exhibition on China's achievements marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China at the Beijing Exhibition Center, in Beijing, China. (Jason Lee/File Photo/Reuters)

With American aircraft carriers paralysed, China's Liaoning leads drills around Taiwan

Contrary to popular belief that military forces might keep a low profile during the global health pandemic, Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan assesses that the PLA will continue training in the waters and airspace around Taiwan to prevent the latter from making any rash moves. Military commentator Song Zhongping says China has the upper hand in this area.
The Chinese national flag flies at half mast at a ceremony mourning those who died of the Covid-19 coronavirus as China holds a nationwide mourning on the Qingming Festival, in Wuhan, China, on 4 April 2020. (China Daily via Reuters)

Was China's three-minute silence enough to comfort its people?

On 4 April, the Chinese people observed a three-minute silence for the thousands of lives lost to the pandemic. However, Beijing correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that accountability checks triggered by the Li Wenliang incident have not fully subsided and may possibly create a new political hoo-ha within and outside of China.
Medical staff prepare to transfer Covid-19 patients from Wuhan No.5 Hospital to Leishenshan Hospital in Wuhan, March 2020. The people of Wuhan are grateful to front line healthcare workers and volunteers. (AFP)

Official's call for city of Wuhan to express gratitude backfires

Angry netizens suggest that Wuhan party secretary Wang Zhonglin’s call for gratitude for the CCP shows where officials’ allegiance truly lies. The testy mood of the public portends the zero tolerance of further grandstanding behaviour.