Yu Zeyuan

Beijing correspondent and senior researcher, Lianhe Zaobao

Yu Zeyuan (real name Yu Haisheng) started in 1993 as a journalist and editor with Xinhua's foreign news desk, then joined the University of Hawaii as a visiting academic from 1996 to 1997. Since 2000, he has been Lianhe Zaobao's Beijing correspondent and senior researcher.

An F/A-18E Super Hornet, attached to the Dambusters of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 195, approaches the flight deck of the Navy's forward-deployed aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) during a drill in the South China Sea, 6 July 2020. (MC2 Samantha Jetzer/Handout/US Navy)

Should China station fighter jets in the South China Sea?

With China-US relations on a downward spiral and the US gearing up for battle in the South China Sea, China’s military academics say that China should stand ready to defend attacks on its reefs in the South China Sea.
People (foreground) swim in the swollen Yangtze River as the roof of an inundated pavilion is seen above floodwaters in Wuhan, Hubei, on 8 July 2020. (STR/AFP)

Floods in China: Can the Three Gorges Dam weather ‘once-in-a-century massive floods in the Yangtze River’?

Close to 20 million people across 26 provinces and cities in the areas spanning China’s southwestern region to the midstream and downstream areas of the Yangtze River have been displaced due to severe flooding over the past few weeks. The Three Gorges Dam has long been held up as a bulwark against such massive floods in the area, but recent signs that it is literally buckling under the pressure cast doubts on its ability to be an effective flood control mechanism.
Indian army soldiers ride in a convoy along a highway leading towards Leh, bordering China, in Gagangir on 17 June 2020. (Tauseef Mustafa/AFP)

China-India border clash: Will India's misperceptions of China's strength lead to war?

For the first time in over four decades, a China-India skirmish in the disputed Himalayan border region at Galwan Valley has resulted in fatalities, and quite a number at that. Diplomatic efforts are going into overdrive, but a series of suspicions and misperceptions on both sides may see the China-India border conflict escalating even higher. China is already flexing its muscles with military exercises in Tibet. When push comes to shove, who will blink first?
Street vendors wait for customers at their vegetable stalls in Jingzhou, 27 March 2020. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

Street stalls: Saviour of livelihoods for ordinary Chinese after Covid-19?

Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei once ran a stall selling slimming pills, and Alibaba founder Jack Ma used to sell small items in Zhejiang. In the wake of the Covid-19 crisis, the street stall economy is making a comeback in China. These stalls were popular in the 1980s and 1990s but declined with efforts by authorities to clean up the streets. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan weighs the pros and cons of reviving the street stall economy.
A masked anti-government protester holds a flag supporting Hong Kong independence during a march against Beijing's plans to impose national security legislation in Hong Kong, 24 May 2020. (Tyrone Siu/REUTERS)

Why Beijing is taking the risk to push through the national security law and rein in Hong Kong

Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan notes that this year’s “two sessions” in China includes a contentious national security law for Hong Kong that has been months in the making. The law is unlikely to go down well in Hong Kong, nor with Hong Kong watchers with vested interests such as the US. What gave Beijing the confidence to push through such a law at this point in time?
Military delegates leave the Great Hall of the People after a meeting ahead of National People's Congress (NPC), China's annual session of parliament, in Beijing, 4 March 2019. (Aly Song/REUTERS)

China's military spending amid the pandemic: Will it go up or down this year?

China's economy has taken a hit from the pandemic, but in the face of external challenges from the US and concerns over cross-straits relations, military spending is expected to be one major topic at China’s upcoming "two sessions". Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the evidence as to whether it will go up or down.
US and Chinese flags at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse in Beijing, 14 February 2019. (Mark Schiefelbein via REUTERS)

China to punish Western 'anti-China' forces and 'make them feel the pain', according to Chinese official media report

Following the filing of lawsuits in the US against China for the coronavirus outbreak, China is preparing to hit back with punitive measures. Australia, too, is facing a suspension of beef exports, while China’s Ministry of Commerce has announced tighter controls over exports of medical supplies. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan reports.
People's Liberation Army soldiers march to their barracks opposite the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on 24 February 2020. (Greg Baker/AFP)

Chinese military starts 79-day exercises amid pandemic to deter Taiwan and warn the US

Chinese PLA forces will be undertaking rigorous training at Bohai Bay near Tianjin for two and a half months. It is probably not a coincidence that Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen’s inauguration day — 20 May — is well within that period and the military’s activities will serve as a constant reminder that any overstepping of the boundaries can be met with sharp reprisals.
Firefighters and paramedics with Anne Arundel County Fire Department wear enhanced PPE while preparing to transport a suspected coronavirus patient, 3 May, 2020. (Alex Edelman/AFP)

Blame game can lead to showdown between China and the US

China and the US are pointing fingers at each other for the coronavirus, with the US seeking accountability and compensation from China. Will it work? And what consequences will there be for China-US relations? Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan examines the circumstances.