Zeng Shi

Journalist, Lianhe Zaobao

Zeng Shi is a Guangzhou-based journalist with Lianhe Zaobao. She has been working at the Guangzhou station for more than ten years, covering South China financial news and societal news.

Pedestrians in a crowded street surrounded by small shops in the city of Changsha, China's Hunan province, 7 September 2020. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

China's e-commerce giants saving youths from the brink of suicide

Statistics show that approximately 100,000 China youths die of suicide every year. In times of coronavirus, the risk of people having suicidal thoughts and possibly acting on them has also increased. Help comes in the form of “suicide interventionists” from China's e-commerce platforms. As online shopping becomes more prevalent, these portals are fast becoming the front lines of shopping for self-harm. Zaobao journalist Zeng Shi looks at how e-commerce companies are taking a proactive role in suicide prevention.
Foodom restaurant is a new concept restaurant that runs with 46 robots.

Guangzhou robot restaurant: Robot chefs did their part during the epidemic

The use of robot chefs in restaurants has been on the rise in recent years. Zaobao journalist Zeng Shi takes a closer look at how Foodom, a robot restaurant in Guangzhou is bringing us one step closer to the future. But that is not all — the robot chefs also volunteered their service in Hubei during the Covid-19 lockdown.
Traditional agricultural markets in China, like the Longdong Market pictured in the photo, are coming under the spotlight amid efforts to stamp out illegal wildlife trading.

The end of wet markets in Guangzhou?

The first few cases of Covid-19 were believed to have been linked to the Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market in Wuhan, where some live wild animals were available for sale. As the virus comes under control in China, traditional agricultural markets in China are coming under the spotlight amid efforts to stamp out illegal wildlife trading. While these markets in the main never had exotic wildlife for sale, the overhaul taking place is threatening the old way of life for many shopkeepers and market-goers. Zeng Shi takes a look at a microcosm of that phenomenon in Guangzhou.
Students wearing face masks arrive at the Huayu Middle School in Shanghai, April 27, 2020. Students returned to class for the first time since schools were closed in January as part of efforts to stop the spread of coronavirus. (Hector Retamal/AFP)

'Mother hens' in China: A phenomenon of East Asian attitudes to education?

Schools in China have been gradually re-opening in the last few weeks. “Mother hens” or parents who fuss over their children's education, had their work cut out during the months of lockdown and their trials with home based e-learning. But most of them have taken it in their stride as they are used to coping with major anxiety amid growing pressure in their children’s education that begins even before kindergarten. And the same goes for the "tiger mums" of South Korea, Singapore and elsewhere. Zaobao reporter Zeng Shi takes a closer look at the "mother hen" phenomenon in China.
Rongji signature dish, "Ginger Oil Snake". (Photo provided by Joyce Lee)

Snake soup, softshell turtle stew... The end of traditional Cantonese cuisine?

With Shenzhen’s tough, new regulations proposed for the sale and consumption of exotic meats ⁠— from animals wild, bred or reared as pets — restaurateurs fear they will have to close their speciality restaurants offering unusual delicacies. Others worry that the heritage of Cantonese cuisine will be lost. Guangzhou-based Lianhe Zaobao reporter Zeng Shi takes a closer look at the issue.
Huang Juan (third from the right) in a group photo with her colleagues from the China Construction Bank. (Photo: Huang Juan)

Ordinary people, extraordinary life (Part III): Huang Juan

(Video and text) This is the story of a woman's leap of faith in leaving 24 years of civil service behind to follow her heart.