China-Singapore relations

Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat at the 16th Joint Council for Bilateral Cooperation (JCBC) and related Joint Steering Council (JSC) meetings on 8 December 2020. (Ministry of Communications and Information)

Singapore DPM: Singapore can help to better connect China with Southeast Asian markets

In this op-ed in conjunction with the 17th Joint Council for Bilateral Cooperation (JCBC) which will take place on 29 December, Singapore's Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat examines how Singapore-China relations go beyond the pandemic, into areas including digital connectivity, green energy efforts, economy and trade, and even "panda diplomacy". These efforts will bring the two countries closer together in the next chapter of bilateral relations.
Participants wave national and party flags as balloons are released at the end of the event marking the 100th founding anniversary of the Communist Party of China, at Tiananmen Square in Beijing, China, 1 July 2021. (Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Chinese ambassador Hong Xiaoyong on CPC’s centenary: Towards a brighter future

On 1 July, a ceremony was held at Tiananmen Square in Beijing commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Communist Party of China. Chinese ambassador to Singapore Hong Xiaoyong shares his thoughts on the key tenets the party has abided by to bring the country this far, and how it will steer the country’s relations with other countries in the years to come.
A banner marking the centenary of the Chinese Community Party is seen at a subway station in Shanghai, China on 28 June 2021. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Former Singapore FM George Yeo on CCP’s centenary: The Chinese revolution continues

George Yeo, Singapore’s former foreign minister, shares his thoughts on China’s evolution with Lianhe Zaobao on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party. He sees the milestone as just a pitstop in the long journey of the Chinese nation. Fresh thinking and innovation will be needed as the country progresses. Equally important, developing a “broad-minded and big-hearted nationalism” which is humble and learns from others will keep China on the path of being a great nation. Here are edited excerpts from the interview.
The Singapore skyline, 31 March 2021. (Roslan Rahman/AFP)

Rich China tycoons park family offices in Singapore

Associate business editor Pang Kia Nian takes a look at the increasing number of wealthy Chinese setting up single family offices (SFOs) — entities that manage assets for one family and is wholly owned or controlled by members of the same family — in Singapore. What makes Singapore an attractive place for high-net-worth individuals to park their offshore assets?
More Chinese tech companies are gaining a presence in Singapore. (Graphic: Ho Han Chong/SPH)

Singapore a popular base for China tech firms

In recent years, China's tech giants such as Alibaba, Tencent and ByteDance have set up regional offices in Singapore. With insights from industry experts, Zaobao senior business correspondent Chew Boon Leong analyses the impact that an influx of Chinese tech companies will have on Singapore. Will it affect Singapore's neutral stance and lead the nation to become a battleground for tech companies from the US and China?
A general view shows the ArtScience Museum (left) against the backdrop of the city skyline in Singapore on 28 January 2021. (Roslan Rahman/AFP)

Singapore's prominent role in China's trade strategy

After taking a hit in early 2020 due to the pandemic, Singapore-China trade quickly rebounded and looks set to be in healthy territory in 2021. China’s increasing focus on regional trade agreements and industrial chains will give an added push. Academics Li Wenlong and Zhang Shiming give their take on what is in store.
The central business district (CBD) of Singapore, 28 January 2021. (Lauryn Ishak/Bloomberg)

Survey shows 70% Chinese have favourable view of Singapore

A recent survey of 1,064 Chinese adults done right before the US presidential elections shows that Chinese people are much more favourably disposed towards Singapore than other rich nations such as Australia, Japan and the US. What does China see in Singapore?
Signage for the digital yuan, also referred to as E-CNY, at a self check-out counter inside a supermarket in Shenzhen, China, on 20 November 2020. (Yan Cong/Bloomberg)

Token economics: How Singapore can boost synergy with China in building digital economies

Academics Pei Sai Fan, David Lee and Yan Li say that an understanding of other countries’ technological culture and policies is crucial in advancing digital economic cooperation. For instance, in the main, Singapore and China are able to mutually respect the differences in their blockchain and token policies, and focus on the complementarity of their approaches. Together, they can deepen their collaboration on central bank digital currencies and other projects, and lead the way regionally and globally in building digital economies of the future.
Military personnel walk past a banner promoting the ASEAN summit in Hanoi, Vietnam, 11 November 2020. (Kham/Reuters)

Former Chinese Vice-Minister He Yafei: Singapore and ASEAN have important roles to play in a multipolar world

Professor He Yafei, a former vice-minister at the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, delivered the keynote address at the Lianhe Zaobao Singapore-China Forum on 3 December. He touched on the imperatives of a new multipolar world, highlighting that being economically close to China, but relying on the US for security protection, is not going to work for the Southeast Asian region. He also spoke about Singapore and China working together bilaterally, for instance in terms of China’s new dual circulation economy, as well in the regional and international arena. Below is the edited transcript of his speech and QnA.