Regulations

A worker in a protective suit disinfects at a closed residential area during lockdown, amid the Covid-19 pandemic, in Shanghai, China, 17 May 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

It takes a mountain of effort to tell the truth about China's economy

Chinese economist David Li Daokui has been mocked by netizens for comments he made at a recent economics forum, where he said that China’s life expectancy has increased by an average of ten days due to pandemic efforts, and suggested setting up quarantine facilities next to factories in order to maintain productivity. But is this derision deserved? Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu analyses the issue.
A resident and a child look out through gaps in the barriers at a closed residential area during lockdown, amid the Covid-19 pandemic, in Shanghai, China, 10 May 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Escape from Shanghai: The sorry state this megacity finds itself in

Despite the decline in daily new Covid-19 cases over the past week, Shanghai has seen stricter anti-epidemic controls implemented to the point of absurdity. Zaobao correspondent Yang Danxu highlights the stranger-than-fiction happenings in Shanghai that have sparked public outrage and shaken people’s confidence in China’s zero-Covid policy.
A resident looks out through a gap in the barrier at a residential area during lockdown, amid the Covid-19 pandemic, in Shanghai, China, 6 May 2022. (Aly Song/Reuters)

Best of both worlds: China wants both zero-Covid and economic growth

China’s dynamic zero-Covid policy has come at a heavy toll on the economy and people’s livelihoods. However, the Chinese authorities believe that economic growth is still possible amid the strict anti-epidemic measures. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan looks into the Chinese government’s strategy to have the best of both worlds.
A health worker wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) is seen at a makeshift testing site outside a museum along a street in Beijing, China, on 4 May 2022. (Jade Gao/AFP)

A Singaporean in China: How Covid brings out the worst in people

A spate of news of pet “cullings” and cruel acts against people amid Covid-19 lockdowns in China have captured widespread public attention. While it may be easy to classify the instigators of such acts as heartless, former journalist Jessie Tan believes that those actions may not be borne out of an individual’s ill nature or will, but a reaction to the complex forces amid the Covid-19 lockdown.
Alibaba founder Jack Ma in Paris, France, 15 May 2019. (Charles Platiau/Reuters)

How Jack Ma’s surname sent shockwaves through China’s capital market

News of the arrest of an individual surnamed Ma in the technology industry in Hangzhou on suspicion of endangering national security led to a sharp drop in the stock market, as people associated the name with Jack Ma, co-founder of Alibaba. Zaobao’s Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu notes that perhaps this is not so surprising, given Jack Ma’s previous trouble with the Chinese government, especially during the crackdown on the “disorderly expansion of capital”.
Customers buy instant noodles, following the Covid-19 outbreak, at a supermarket in Beijing, China, 25 April 2022. (Tingshu Wang/Reuters)

Pandemic in China: Will Beijing repeat Shanghai's mistakes?

Fears and anxiety from Shanghai’s dire Covid-19 situation is spreading to other cities. In particular, Beijing is now seeing panic buying and residents preparing for the worst. People are getting ready for a lockdown that may not even happen, but given their ordeal in the early outbreak of the pandemic in 2020, their fears are not unfounded. Zaobao's Beijing correspondent Yang Danxu reveals the situation on the ground.
Quarantine workers in personal protective equipment (PPE) at a residential building during a lockdown due to Covid-19 in Shanghai, China, on 20 April 2022. (Qilai Shen/Bloomberg)

Singaporeans in Shanghai: How to cope when a city shuts down during the pandemic

Zaobao correspondent Chen Jing speaks with Singaporeans who are based in Shanghai to find out how the resurgence of Covid-19 cases has impacted them. While some have gone through great pains to escape the locked down city, others have stayed behind, sharing the hardship — and joys — with the local community.
A man walks along a street in the central business district in Beijing, China, on 18 April 2022. (Wang Zhao/AFP)

China’s unified national market will benefit ASEAN in the long run

The authorities are taking steps to solve the issue of the Chinese market being “big but not strong” by standardising rules and standards and unifying the national market. But local governments used to fighting for their region’s interest at the expense of the national interest may find the changes hard to swallow.
Graduates attend a graduation ceremony at Central China Normal University in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, 13 June 2021. (Stringer/Reuters)

Record 10.76 million Chinese university graduates face bleak job market and struggling economy

With over ten million Chinese university students set to graduate this year, the competition for jobs will be more intense than ever, and it does not help that certain sectors are scaling back recruitments for various reasons. Can the potential mismatch of jobs and skills be rectified? And will the impact of youth employment difficulties spill over to other areas?