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US President Joe Biden holds a semiconductor chip as he speaks prior to signing an executive order, aimed at addressing a global semiconductor chip shortage, in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, US, 24 February 2021. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)

America turning to state intervention to win US-China tech war

Analyst Zheng Weibin notes that heightened US-China competition means a technological edge will be key. To safeguard that advantage, the US may rely on state intervention in the science and technology sector, while tapping on its alliance network. How will this approach affect China and the world?
A giant screen shows a view of earth from the Tianhe core module of China's space station, at a shopping mall in Beijing, China, 18 June 2021. (Thomas Peter/Reuters)

Will the US be left out of China’s space station projects?

When the US started the International Space Station (ISS) in the 1990s, China was not part of the programme. While many think that China was left out, others say that China spearheaded its own spaceflight programme and never asked to be included in the ISS. Now, with China’s Tiangong space station project well underway, it could push ahead and lead the space exploration race when the ISS expires in 2024. Zaobao correspondent Yu Zeyuan explores the implications.
Staff members examine the return module of China's Chang'e-5 lunar probe in Siziwang Banner, in northern China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region on 17 December 2020. (STR/AFP)

China’s strides in technology good for US and the world

Adherence to IP protection and the rule of law are common and valid concerns of US and Western practitioners doing business in China. Commentator Deng Qingbo says that in that light, China’s recent stated focus on technological innovation should be cheered, as science, rational thinking, abiding by the rules, and even democracy often go together. At the same time, the Chinese need to better communicate their desire to share the fruits of their technological advancements with the rest of the world.
A Long March 3B rocket carrying the Beidou-3GEO3 satellite lifts off from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in Xichang in China's southwestern Sichuan province, 23 June 2020. (STR/AFP)

From earth to space: India and China's space programmes gear up for intense competition ahead

China launched the final satellite for the Beidou system on 23 June. Consisting of 35 satellites, Beidou is an impressive operational satellite navigation system significant for China in a number of ways. Most importantly, it removes China's reliance on the US GPS system. China's space programme started in the late 1950s with rocket technology transfer from the Soviet Union, while India's space journey began in the 1960s with support from the US and France. Both countries have come a long way and are now ratcheting up their efforts to secure a foothold in this frontier as the world’s geopolitical battles get launched into space.